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  1. Tea Master 🤣

    January 3, 2023 by ThePieMan

    The PieMan is now a Tea Master. All jokes aside, what has been an exploration into all things “Tea” over the past 3+ years has culminated in graduation from the Dilmah School of Tea, Certified Tea Master Certificate program. Starting off with the ITA Tea Sommelier Milestone Program back in 2019, and extensively focusing on Chinese Tea, COVID pandemic management got in the way of completing the Mastery Level Program. In spite of living in China, it now looks like that program will not be operating again, any time soon. Be that as it may, it led to the development of my Tea Blog, 茶笔 Chá Bǐ – The Tea Pen.

    Looking around at what was available, Dilmah Tea, recognising the difficulties the pandemic presented in accessing tea schools, took their programs online and offered significant discounts on all their programs. This, in and of itself represents a significant benefit to the aspiring tea professional. The program is a self-paced study system, and I took just over 12 months to complete the program. You can definitely complete it in a much shorter time, however there were a few challenges that I needed to dwell on until I was more comfortable with completing certain tasks.

    The program is interesting, and mentally challenging, it is also highly unforgiving. You get one go only at the quizzes and some a sufficiently short enough that a single wrong answer can penalise you heavily.The program culminates in a practical presentation where the student needs to present, on video either a food or drink inspired by tea. My presentation can be seen here:

    Recipe Below…

    This Jasmine Green Tea Flummery contrasts the grassy astringency of the tea, against the sharp acidity of the fruit, and the sweetness of the shortbread biscuit. It blends the aromas of the fruits with the floral bouquet of the tea, and counterpoints the temperature and texture of the mousse against conventional conceptions of how tea looks and presents on the palate.” 

    Tsc Tempest, DCA. Shanghai, China. 2022.12.31

    Flummery

    1. Make a strong green tea:
      1. 250ml hot water
      2. 4 tea bags of Dilmah Jasmine Green Tea
      3. Steep for 5-7 min. and remove the tea bags
    2. Bloom the Gelatine:
      1. place one sheet of gold leaf gelatine in some cold water
      2. when fully hydrated, squeeze out the water and use immediately.
    3. Make Tea Jelly:
      1. combine tea, reheat if necessary, and gelatine
      2. stir until gelatine is dissolved
      3. place in refrigerator and chill for 20-25 min.
    4. Make a Dairy-free Flummery (Whipped Jelly):
      1. Remove jelly from refrigerator, it should be thick but not set
      2. beat into a foam with a whisk until light and airy
      3. pour flummery into glass cups and place aside in the refrigerator until firmly set

    Garnishes

    1. Shortbread Biscuit Wafer:
      1. coarsely crush 70g of shortbread biscuits
      2. add 1/2 – 1 teaspoon of dried passionfruit pulp (blot the pulp with kitchen towel)
      3. melt a tablespoon of coconut oil 
      4. combine oil with the biscuit mix and spread out thinly on a plate or platter
      5. cut into wafer shapes
      6. place in refrigerator to chill
    2. Kiwifruit circles:
      1. slice kiwifruit into 1-2mm thick pieces
      2. cut out small circles from the firm flesh with a smooth piping bag nozzle
      3. set aside
    3. Mango slivers:
      1. take a slice of firm sweet mango
      2. peal and cut into thin slivers
      3. set aside
    4. Passionfruit Foam:
      1. add soy lecithin (6g/l) to strained passionfruit juice
      2. blend with stick blender until foamy
      3. expedite use quickly

    Assembly

    1. remove flummery cups from fridge and place on saucers
    2. garnish with a shortbread wafer, kiwifruit circles,  mango slivers, and a teaspoon of passionfruit foam
    3. serve immediately.

    My Inspiration for this Creation

    I started with the simple idea of Tea with Shortbread Biscuits, and fruit. A play on Afternoon tea, if you will, using an old memory of a non-dairy flummery from my childhood. 

    Flummery, also known as whipped jelly, is an old technique which surprisingly fits well into today’s Modernist cooking techniques. It is a whipped, cold set, foam that provides a blank canvas for a modern chef’s creativity whilst retaining tangible links to a storied, 400 year old, pedigree.

    http://www.foodsofengland.co.uk/flummery.htm First mention of flummery early 1600’s

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_in_the_United_Kingdom First mention of Tea in the UK early 1600’s

    Flummery originated as a starch based set jelly. Over time its flavour has varied between sour, and sweet, increasingly included a dairy ingredient, and the setting agent had varied between starch, innisglass, and gelatine.  

    I was fascinated with the idea of turning a drink into a desert and initially thought of making a kind of cheesecake-like presentation. However, feedback was not very flattering so after discussions with my Mum, always infomative, I decided on a presentation using a cup, reinforcing the idea of a drink but not a drink.

    Concept is good, biscuit base needs a darker contrast, the fruit topping could use red grapes, strawberries, dark berry fruits, or passionfruit pulp rather than the passionfruit foam, for more colour. This is worth revisiting.

    Now, Modern Cooking science has expanded the range of possible setting agents for various gels, foams, mousses, and airs, expanding the potential for making both hot and cold, sweet or savoury, flummeries.

    A Flummery in the 21C, ought to be considered a class of foods made with similar whipped gel techniques, that has a history, or pedigree, that extends back in time equally as far as that of the history of Tea in Britain.

    In essence, the flummery should be, ought to be, an essential 21C Afternoon Tea element, as a class of food items, rather than a ye olde worlde simple gelatine set mousse.

    Imaging if you will: 

    • a Flummery of Tomato Consommé served on a base, or garnished with slices, of tea smoked duck confit; or
    • a vol-au-vent filled with black tea and lemon infused flummery mousse topped with strawberry liquid spheres or caviar; or
    • a smoked tea infused potato and leak (and bacon) soup with hot, piped konjac or agar agar flummery islands, infused with black cardamom chai.

    This was the basis of my final practical exam submission for the Certified Team Master certificate, and I am happy to say that I fulfilled the requirements and successfully graduated from the program.

    The PieMan is now a, Tea Master! 🤣


  2. Introducing…

    November 27, 2019 by ThePieMan

    In last 3-4 months there have been many activities afoot at Vila Tempest. We are still based in Shanghai but have relocated to a smaller location. This has meant we’ve had to downsize Life in many ways. However, this has opened up some new possibilities to explore.

    Allow me to introduce to you some new products and services we are beginning to explore and offer.

    I-Reiki: Being a Reiki Master/Teacher since 2015, we thought it was about time to explore offering Reiki to others. You can find out more about this over at I-Reiki.

    Intentional Oils: We have begun exploring cold pressed nut and seed oils infused with Reiki Energy and Positive Intentions. This is an exciting product as we believe there is currently no other supplier of such a product anywhere in the market. To find out more visit Intentional Oils.

    Black Garlic: This is an exciting product par excellence! Our first commercially available batch is still a bit over a week away, but initial trials have been outstanding!

    Black garlic is a transformative product, a respected and desired superfood, and we can’t wait to see how it tastes in some of our new pie recipes. Who knows? You might even see it infused into some of our cold pressed nut and seed oils! So, watch this space.


  3. Technical Difficulties

    November 26, 2019 by ThePieMan

    Apologies to one and all.

    Due to Technical Difficulties our site went offline in August, but we only became cognisant of that fact just the other day and have been busy working behind the scenes to get back online.

    The Internet is becoming more and more a weird, and wild place, in which to have a presence. However, we are glad to be back up and running.


  4. The PieMan is Back!

    July 19, 2019 by ThePieMan

    Aussie pie connoisseurs rejoice! The PieMan is back! and you can find him in residence in Shanghai.

    This summer we will be exploring a whole new world of pie fillings, to bring to you the best pies on offer, to all you true pie connoisseurs, in Shanghai.

    Villa Tempest Pies are bespoke, hand made on demand, made to order pies. They offer exceptional flavour, and are the pies you choose for us to make, not what we choose to make that day and then offer to send to you.

    Unlike commercial companies, Villa Tempest is a one man show, offering a person to person, personalised service in order to bring you the best tasting pies, outside of Australia or any other pie-oriented culture, today.

    For now, relax and rejoice, because The PieMan is back!


  5. Happy New Year

    January 1, 2019 by Villa Tempest

    To You and Yours, from Us and Ours, we wish you all the very best for the coming Year, 2019.

    We hope that your goals and dreams, this year, amount to being everything you hope for.

    Over the coming months we hope to resolve grittiness issues, with our stone flour mills; to successfully make, “On Demand” fresh ground pastry flour from whole wheat berries; to improve our bread and pie baking processes; and to offer something tasty, and new to interested expats in our local region.

    All the best from Villa Tempest!


  6. WELL, WE’VE HAD QUITE THE ROCKY ROAD…

    December 10, 2018 by Villa Tempest

    In the last few years we seem to run foul of attempts to Stop Fake News, Control Anonymous Postings, and other such socially-encouraged, vigilante justice like Scroll-by (drive by) Social Network Assassination.

    My Facebook Profile has been down since February 2016, LinkedIn, and Xing, in quick succession shortly after that, and more recently my Twitter accounts – Funny, my clearly pseudonymous Twitter feed was/is quite ok? Go figure.

    To make matters worse, we missed a Bluehost Renewal Deadline by a week and somehow their system deleted Our site, completely. Thankfully the Wayback Machine had us covered and we were able to recover most of our former postings and image library.

    We have now moved over to Internet Solutions HK, for domain registration and hosting, and hope things will be soon put right again. It’s been so frustrating, trying to recover our entire site, and even the WordPress backups that we had made via Bluehost turn out to be incompatible with the new hosting regime – something to do with .tar files are not .xmr files, or something like that. Grrrrr…!

    So, do please bear with us, we will be up and running again soon. But, for now, I’d like to give a shout out to all of those food bloggers who took the time, in the past, to check out our info, test it and give a thumbs up in appreciation, especially the folks at ALE.is.GooD – it feels great to know that we are being read from time to time.

    Cheers!

    Tsc Tempest (… and yes, that is my real name!)


  7. 4K Video Dowloader

    April 2, 2017 by Villa Tempest

    From time to time, we find amazing videos of beautifully created food. Sometimes so amazing in fact that we want to watch the videos over and over again. Since we are not always online 24-7 we like to watch videos offline, and cast to our TV. The best way we’ve found to do this is to use 4K Video Downloader. We’ve been using it now for over 4 years and, at least for the Mac Platform, we haven’t found anything better, and today we’ve finally stopped looking. It just works. We’ve never once been nagged for testimonials, or for likes, or for advertising, or money, and as far as we can tell, we haven’t received a barrel load of email notifications either. In essence, its a sweet application, that regularly gets updated, and is free, to good homes. We’re happy with it.

    Cheers.

     


  8. Having fun with KFC

    February 21, 2017 by Villa Tempest

    So a while back, they released a picture of the, apparently, “Original Recipe” Eleven Spices and Herbs, which were locked up in some safe somewhere, which they later encased in clear plastic resin, twice: burying one, as I understand it, in one corner of the Corporate headquarters. So here are some pics from around, “the net…”

    Having a cuddle…

    Holding it up…

    (more…)


  9. Culinary Traditions underpinning the development of Australia’s Chiko Roll

    November 11, 2016 by Villa Tempest

    The Chiko Roll is an iconic Australian fast food item. Essentially it is a savoury pastry roll filled with a meat-vegetable-cereal filling and deep fried. Here we examine the history behind the Chiko Roll and explore the culinary traditions that underpin it development and creation.

    History

    There are many sites on the web redistributing various versions of the history and development off the Chiko Roll, most can be summed up by this Museum Display case caption:

    The Chiko Roll is an old-fashioned fast food which is still sold in shops today! It was first sold at the Wagga Show over 50 years ago. Wagga was the birthplace of the Chiko Roll. The inventor? A Bendigo boilermaker named Francis Gerald McEnroe. “He made his first rolls on a small hand-fed sausage machine. They were made of boned mutton (lamb), celery, cabbage, barley, rice, carrots and spices. This combination was then wrapped in a thick egg and flour dough, then fried. Both ends were hand-painted.” (source)

    … and according to, Wikipedia …the font of all modern internet wisdom, the story (the mythology? the legend?) goes like this:

    In 1950, McEncroe saw a competitor selling Chinese chop suey rolls outside Richmond Cricket Ground and decided to add a similar product to his own line. McEncroe felt that the Chinese rolls were too flimsy to be easily handled in an informal outdoor setting, and hit upon the idea of a much larger and more robust roll that would provide a quick meal that was both reasonably substantial and easily handled.

    So, where did he start? What were the origins and culinary traditions that informed this boilermaker and allowed him to develop a roll so popular, yet so baffling, still to this day, to the public and to professional chefs alike?

    Culinary Traditions

    First, a summary: Francis Gerald McEnroe was a Bendigo boilermaker, that apparently sold fast food items at football matches, saw in 1950 something called a, “Chop Suey Roll,”  decided to make it better and revealed this deep fried savoury pastry roll to the public at the Wagga Show.

    According to Cooks Info:

    The Chiko factories make as one long roll which is cooked, then sliced, then pastry ends are added, then the rolls are fried a second time.

    So, let’s start where most people don’t, with the pastry.

    Deep Fried Pastry

    In “The English & Australian Cookery Book” by Edward Abbot (apparently Australia’s first published cook book, 1864) on page 17 under section VI – Frying, Abbot refers to Veal Rissoles and states to:

    Mince and pound veal fine; grate into it some remains of cooked ham. Mix them together with béchamel sauce; form into balls, and inclose each in pastry. Fry them of a nice brown.

    Veal Rissoles

    A more contemporary (to McEnroe) reference comes to us by way of a Recipe for, “Pastry Rissoles” (Self Help Recipes and Household Hints. 1932. New Zealand. p67) in which we are entreated to:

    Roll out pastry and cut into rounds, place a little of the mixture on each. Damp the edges, fold over and brush with egg and dip in breadcrumbs or finely broken vermicelli. Fry in deep fat.”

    Thus, it would appear that fried pastry was a commonly known culinary concept in both Australia and New Zealand even from the earliest days.

    Pastry Rissoles

    Why a Roll?

    Well, we know that sausage rolls have existed for quite some time, apparently McEnroe, felt his market niche was in a fried roll, so making a Chiko Roll, inspired by the Chop Suey rolls of his competitors was possibly a better option to that of trying to make a better, baked, sausage roll.

    But wait, what is this “Chop Suey Roll,” that has been mentioned? Is it a spring roll, or an egg roll? What exactly, and who made them?

    From the Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Labour and National Services, in the book, “Standard Recipes for industrial cafeterias and other large food services” (1957, p97) Chop Suey is a mix of stewed meat and rice. (boned veal, fresh pork, celery, onion, stock; cooked rice.)

    Chop Suey

    It would appear then, that a Chop Suey Roll was a typical Chinese Spring/Egg Roll with Chop Suey as a filling. But wait, there is another roll of interest to us, and this one gives us almost all the ingredients for the filling as well as the dimensions for the final roll, oddly enough.

    Also from “Standard Recipes” (pp112-113) we are given a recipe for “Cornish Rolls” which incorporates a firm sausage of minced meat, stock, carrots, turnips, swedes, cooked potatoes, parsnips, onions, salt, pepper, flour-water thickening, short or flaky pastry, and coloring. The pastry is rolled out to 6”-8” wide and length to suit a standard sheet pan. However, the pastry is filled cold, rolled pinched, baked and cut to serving size. It also mentions that cooked meet can be substituted for raw.

    Cornish Rolls

    So, we sort of have a contemporary method here, plus ingredients close to what McEnroe is said to have used, but its missing the barley, cabbage and celery. In addition to this, it seems that McEnroe modified the pastry dough to include egg, perhaps to improve the frying characteristics of the dough. What ever he did though resulted in a dough of extraordinary and distinctive character.

    The Filling

    Disregarding the modern Chiko Roll ingredient list for now, let’s revisit the story – “mutton (lamb), celery, cabbage, barley, rice, carrots and spices.

    Compared with the filling for Cornish Rolls, there’s turnips, swedes, potatoes or parsnip included, some missing ingredients. Why these particular ingredients and why put them in? The rice, I think is a tilt at the Chop Suey in the Chop Suey Roll.

    Next, if we take a look at a recipe for “Lancashire Hot Pot” (Standard Recipes, p102) we find the ingredients include: stewing meat, haricot beans, barley, onions, leeks or celery, cabbage, carrots, turnips, swedes, salt, pepper, potatoes, and stock.

    Lancashire Hot Pot

    Now, consider “Scotch Broth” (Standard Recipes, p53) with includes: mutton shanks, mutton broth, pearl barley, flaked oatmeal, carrots, onions, turnips, celery (if available), salt, pepper, and parsley.

    Scotch Broth

    All of these recipes have their own typical home equivalent, so it is not unreasonable to consider that the Chiko Roll was originally a stripped down Lancashire Hot Pot – Scotch Broth combo with rice tipped into the mix, and made along the lines of Cornish Rolls. Thus we have mutton, pearl barley, rice rather than oats, onions, cabbage, celery, carrots (for color), salt, and pepper; whilst omitting most of the other root vegetables and the haricot beans.

    Spices

    Salt is often treated these days as a separately listed ingredient. Salt and Pepper, in the past were often called Seasoning for simplicity. But what about other spices? A common additive for soups and stews in Australia was, Worcestershire Sauce. In our recipe for “Chop Suey” (above) it is mentioned that, “Worcestershire Sauce may be added as an accompaniment if desired.

    Thus, it is not unreasonable to conjecture that it is also used here to add something to the filling mix.

    Observations

    The Chiko Roll has a long and distinguished pedigree in Australian and New Zealand cuisine traditions, traditions built on a backbone of a British heritage. There is no doubt that the Chiko Roll was a new twist on original favorites, combining several different dish formulations together in a response to perceived flaws in the Chop Suey Roll. As a result, McEnroe created, what is now undoubtedly one of Australia’s most iconic foods, keeping alive, what is otherwise a forgotten food tradition, that of the fried, pastry rissole.

    The Chiko Roll, undoubtedly, is no rissole, nor is it a White Australian knock-off of a Chinese snack. Instead, it is a fried variation on a baked, Cornish Roll, using the ingredients common to it, Lancashire Hot Pot, and Scotch Broth. A hearty, fried savory dough item that springs from a long culinary tradition common to the United Kingdom and it Colonies. This iconic Australian food item deserves our respect, and not our bemused, mystified derision.

    So next Australia Day, include the Chiko Roll in your food menu and take a moment in silent respect for Mr. Francis Gerald McEnroe, the genius that is the Chiko Roll, and the humble food traditions from out of which this culinary star was born.

    References

    1. Museum of the Riverina. “The Gold Chiko Roll.” Wagga Wagga City Council. Published 5 June 2007. Web. Accessed 11.11.2016. <http://museumriverina.com.au/collections/highlights/the-gold-chiko-roll#.WCWH6zuBOkp>.
    2. Wikipedia. “Chiko Roll.” Revised 20 September 2016. Web. Accessed 11.11.2016. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiko_Roll>.
    3. Oulton, Randal. “Chiko Rolls.” CooksInfo.com. Published 17 September 2006; revised 12 März 2010. Web. Accessed 11.11.2016. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/chiko-rolls>.
    4. Abbot, Edward. “The English & Australian Cookery Book” London, UK. Sampson Low, Son and Marston. 1864. Reprint. The Culinary Historians of Tasmania. 2014.
    5.  Johnstone, Kathleen B., Self Help Co-op.  “Self Help recipes and household hints.” Wellington, NZ. George W. Slade Ltd. 1932.
    6. Department of Labour and National Services. “Standard Recipes for industrial cafeterias and other large food services.” Melbourne, Au. Commonwealth of Australia. 1957

     

    Citation

    Tempest, Tsc. “Culinary Traditions underpinning the development of Australia’s Chiko Roll.” VillaTempest.de. Published 11.11. 2016. Web. <https://www.villatempest.com/2016/11/11/chiko-roll-culinary-traditions/>


  10. Lufthansa Cocktail Liqueur, a diy recipe

    June 27, 2016 by Villa Tempest

    What motivates you? For me, it trying to track down or develop a recipe for some obscure, shrouded in mister and time, recipe for some such thing. Today, I present for your consideration my efforts to explore the Lufthansa Cocktail Liqueur.

    History

    Developed in 1955 by Mampe for Lufthansa, apparently they developed three bottled products, Party, Bitter, and Dry Martini. They were pre-bottled to make it easier to mix in the galley of the Plane. It would appear that “Bitter” is what is known today as the “Classic” mix.

    Lufthansa Cocktail Likör

    The cocktail, apparently fell out of favour in the mid 80’s but was revived for its 50th Aniversary in 2005 by Berentzen amid a marketing hype of nostalgia. The Berentzen remake contained apparently 12 premium ingredients (Marketers! shades of kfc’s secret original recipe, don’t you think?) and came in at 30% alcohol.

    Lufthansa Cocktail Likör

    In 2015, ten years later, Small Big Brands gave the drink another makeover, bringing it down to around 15.5% along with adding 6 other mixes to the lineup. It is safe to say that this current incarnation of the Lufthansa Cocktail is a vastly different drink.

    Lufthansa Cocktail Likör

    Status Quo

    According to Lufthansa Magazine, to make a Lufthansa Cocktail you need to mix the liqueur in a 1:1 ratio split. That is, one part liqueur to one part mixer. This mixer can be orange juice & lemon juice, soda water, sekt, or champagne. We also know that the original cocktail liqueur was described as an orange-apricot liqueur. The cocktail that the guest got to drink would vary in alcohol content between 15-21% if we go by Berentzen’s ABV. The Lufthansa Cocktail Recipe typically calls for a 40ml measure of Lufthansa Cocktail Liqueur. Why? Because that is the size of the little single serve bottles of spirits on the plane.

    www.lhm-lounge.de_beitrag_3562545

     

    Looking at what Mampe was familiar with, we could hazard a guess that it was some portion of Mampe’s Halb und Halb, plus a small addition of Mampe’s Bittere Tropfen, and then some additions to balance out the sweetness, bitterness, and alcohol content of the final product. Either way, the serving suggestion was on the bottle.

    Lufthansa Cocktail Likör

    With no listing of the ingredients in Berentzen’s mix we we have no direct link between the current and the past, other than both were 30% abv. But! Take heart, there is enough to put together an educated guess, and combine the ides of the past with the reality of the present.

    Perameters

    750ml Production Volume

    30% abv

    Orange, Apricot, Sweet & Bitter notes

    The current Lufthansa Cocktail Classic offering lists: Rose Vermouth, Bitter Aperitif, Raspberry Eau de vie, and Elderflower, and is described as fruity, fresh, balanced between sweet and dry.

    Rosé Vermouth is typically around 17.5% abv (current recipe doing the viral rounds); Bitter Aperitif is around 39% abv (note: older cocktail recipes often refer to using Orange Bitters) – this fits our preferred profile; Raspberry Eau de vie is a liqueur of around 45% abv, and Elderflower is typically used as a syrup, i.e. 0 abv.

    In my personal opinion, the balance of this above, strongly shifted towards sweet and fruity, away from orange and apricots and more towards berry fruits. The strongest alcohols here are the bitters and raspberry Eau de vie, which become the dominant portions in this mix. The syrup and the vermouth are both diluents, yet, while the vermouth may perhaps have a strong impact on the flavour profile, we really don’t know in which direction this Rosé Vermouth is profiled.

    However, this gives us a starting point for pulling together some target products to mix together.

    The List currently stands at (German Products, chosen for no particular reason other than this was originally a German concoction – Disclaimer: I make no claim to any endorsement here, implied or otherwise. I have no connection with any of these products, companies or parent companies.):

    Belsazar Rosé Wermut; The Bitter Truth Orange Bitters; Prinz Himbeergeist; and Monin Holunderblütensirup.

    Let’s add one more product which I will use in our subsequent recipe, Prinz Marillen-Schnapps (clear Apricot Brandy). We’re adding this because orange and apricot are the principle flavours of the original recipe.

    The Recipe

    The following recipe is my best guess at a Recipe for Lufthansa Cocktail Liqueur (Lufthansa Cocktail Likör) it is not the original recipe, nor is it the recipe for any of the subsequent incarnations, but it is informed by what’s been written on the subject and some educated mixology guesswork. So, enjoy, if you will the only recipe on the web for this bottled cocktail mix.

    Lufthansa Cocktail Liqueur Recipe (Lufthansa Cocktail Likör Rezept) 30% abv.

    250ml Belsazar Rosé Wermut – Rosé Vermouth

    370 ml Prinz Marillen-Schnapps – Apricot Schnapps/Brandy

    75 ml  Prinz Himbeergeist – Framboise/Raspberry Eau de vie

    20 ml The Bitter Truth Orange Bitters – Orange Bitters

    55 ml Monin Holunderblütensirup – Elderflower Syrup

    Combine all the ingredients, mix well and bottle. Makes 1 x 750ml batch. Serving Suggestion: To 2 full measures of Liqueur add an equal portion of well chilled Sekt or Champagne. Serve in a tumbler over ice, or in a saucer rimmed with a lemon segment and dipped in sugar. Garnish with a slice of lemon, or a cherry.

     

    Addendum.

    It should be said that “Lufthansa Cocktail” is a proprietary name, and the “real” recipe is secret. That being said, anyone who has drunk this cocktail in the last 10 years or so has not drunk the original but one of the authorized variants. Anyone who remembers the original has a dimming memory of something experienced more than 30 years ago.

    I have never drunk this cocktail mix, and like many today, have an interest in it only to satisfy the wishes of someone in our parentage who is  reminiscing over this once luxury indulgence. So, keep this in mind. What you are making here is a best guess attempt at something that few remember, and if someone close to you claims to, then they are laying claim to a fond memory and your role here is to elicit and stimulate that memory. I hope, this recipe does help you do that.

    Cheers.